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"JAPANESE DESIGN: A SURVEY SINCE 1950" par Katheryn B. HEISINGER & Felice FISCHER. Editions The Philadelphia Museum of Art en collaboration avec Harry N. Abrams. 1995.
Ref LCU0153

JAPANESE DESIGN: A SURVEY SINCE 1950

€45.00Prix
  • "JAPANESE DESIGN: A SURVEY SINCE 1950" par Katheryn B. HEISINGER & Felice FISCHER. Editions The Philadelphia Museum of Art en collaboration avec Harry N. Abrams. 1995. Imprimé au Japon. Grand in-4 carré, dos droit, couverture souple cartonnée illustrée en couleurs à rabat. 236 pages. Texte en anglais illustré de 255 reproductions photographiques couleurs in-texte et hors texte. Ouvrage réalisé dans le cadre de l'exposition éponyme au Philadelphia Museum of Art du 25 Septembre au 20 Novembre 1994.

    "The development of design education in Japan followed two separated paths. Before World War II, it was shaped by developments in Germany, particularly the Deutscher Werkbund and the Bauhaus, while after war, the American industrial design approach, which had made extensive inroads in close association with industry, had a significant impact. While Japan's art education was reformed under the influence of the Bauhaus before the war, design education was not immediately established as a specialized discipline. Indeed, it was not until the early postwar period, during the 1950s, that specialized design education at the high-school and university level had their real beginnings in Japan. The 1950s marked the dawn of Japanese design itself. This decade witnessed a new beginning, heralded by the adoption, in the early 1950s, of the world "design" itself, a direct borrowing from Anglo-Saxon usage. Before the war, the Japanese concepts denoting design had all been terms written in Chinese characters, such as zuan (design/sketch/pattern) and isho (design/idea). In Japanese, words of foreign origin (loan words) are transliterated in a phonetic syllabic alphabet known as katakana. The word "design" (dezain) presented in this phonetic transliteration was a new concept also in the sense that it stood for change, a revolutionary start with the promise of a new hope after the war..." Shutaro Mukai. Ref LCU0153